For years I treated my stuff as replaceable.

I didn’t take very good care of it because I thought- ok- if it breaks -I’ll buy another.

I was under the impression that stuff is there to serve me while it lasts, and since buying new is always a nice thing (or so I thought) and since I work very hard and raise 3 kids and take care of the house- I don’t have the time to spare /waste on stuff maintenance.

After minimising my stuff , and understanding the importance of frugality combined with mindful minimalism in the environmental aspect, I understood that I would have to change my attitude towards my stuff.

The first thing I did was start reading the instruction manuals/labels/tags carefully before operating or using any device.

In the past, I bought something, took a look at it, and started using it instinctively, thinking why waste time and effort on reading useless manuals .

Turns out there are a ton of important things you can learn from reading the tags.

For instance-here is my calphalon pan. below are the using instructions.

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20190122_145145.jpg 1. hand wash only.

2. for better cooking results- preheat the pan without any oil.

3. after cooking allow to cool before washing.

ok- truth is I would never have done instructions 2+3 hadn’t i read the label.

Another tip is to take a photo of the instructions-labels-warranty and mail it to my gmail -to keep under the products name.

I always keep the receipts, the only thing is I can never remember a year or two later, when the receipt is needed, where I put it….

Sure- you can keep a binder -I did that too- but this leads to heaps of papers -and wasted time looking for the specific receipt when needed. not with gmail/

And no- I don’t have any shares in gmail sadly.

here is another example: my pizza pan.

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(Getting nothing from anyone here -so just buy or not- none of my business.)

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I would never have saved this warranty tag before- but this is a lifetime warranty and why not take a quick photo and save it? and why not read the using instructions carefully before making the first pizza?

Another tip is to remember to clean your vacuum cleaner and fully recharge it after every use. can’t count the times I began vacuuming the house only to find out it stopped working and needs a 2 hour charge ..

Same goes with the IRobot– to keep it running smoothly- clean it thoroughly at least once a month and change the necessary parts every 6 months- it will hold for much longer.

Your washing machine? definitely needs a full check up once a month.

I clean the filter let it run empty with only citric acid to keep from suds building up and clogging it.

*Do your own research -I have no idea if my tips are good for your stuff too- I do know that the basic principle of learning how to take better care of your stuff- can save you a lot of money and replacing time.

*These are all examples- I can think of many more as I am writing this- like pouring baking soda and vinegar with hot water down my kitchen sink once a month, not pouring my coffee to my sink  unless I threw the coffee grains residue to the compost before (seriously- this is a sure way to clog your sink!) , washing my my wooden floors only with a damp cloth and never leaving water spots on it, changing my dish scrubs every week and so on. 

Before I wrap up- I need to  mention laundry regulations..

#1:The obvious thing is to seperate whites from colours.

#2: separate towels and bed linens from clothes.why? because linens are big and have a tendency to wrap a loving hug around all the other clothes you put in the laundry, and the hugged clothes don’t get much of the laundry cycle besides that hug, which to you is pretty irrelevant I should think.

#3: get a mesh bag for your socks. this will save you time and effort gathering those socks – especially the ones that decided that laundry time is their chance to escape their sock spouse. this will also prolong your machine’s life since instead of the beach in Thailand the escaped socks usually find their way to the machine insides or pipes.

#4: read those labels before putting your precious shirts to the laundry machine…

I admit I never buy garments that need dry cleaning- This is too much of a hassle for me and I’ve read the fumes from dry cleaning are quite an ecological hazard- I am not 100% sure about that but since it is so easy to find great substitutes that are glad to be washed either by hand or in the laundry machine, why bother?

I believe I made my point.

Check your stuff for use and care instructions, take good care of it and save yourself a lot of time and money- all the while minimizing your carbon footprint . yay on all counts.

Now it’s time to learn how to make this great pizza at home.

The dough is from “food network”- here is the link- just click.  great pizza dough

By the way when he writes “dry yeast 1 envelope” I am using 1 tbsp of dry yeast .turns great indeed.

For the sauce- 1 canned tomatoes, tomato paste -small , 1/4 cup water, salt, pepper, a little sugar to contradict the acidity of the tomatoes, heat and stir for 10 minutes on low, add basil or oregano if you like, don’t (add) if you don’t (like), taste and cool a bit. this can freeze well too.

Since my household prefers thin based pizza, I had to learn how to stretch that dough to the maximum- I started with a rolling pin and that didn’t do the job one bit. so I started using my hands, and managed to get the dough to top the pan then quickly put the sauce on top.

Now here you have to be careful- since in my experience- thin dough+regular amount of rich sauce =disaster.

But: thin dough +thin layer of rich sauce=success.

Plus- don’t let the sauce wait on the pizza for too long before entering the oven-in my experience- the sauce tends to wet the thinly stretched dough- you don’t want to go there believe me.

About the cheese– well honestly I mixed the cheese I had in the freezer, (not cheap yet not mozzarella) but in my experience the trick is  to top all the leftovers with good mozzarella- it looks and tastes great -so my household members say. (about the looks you can judge for yourselves:)

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By the way- the picture above is one of my pizza’s as well

About toppings- go for it and use what you got- sweet potatoes, olives, whatever.

I always double the quantities, and use 1 kilo of flour -2 tbsp dry yeast and double the rest. it makes 6 medium sized pizzas and I slice and freeze them to be eaten in the next two weeks.

why slice?

Because sometimes my partner/son only want a slice (rarely but happens) and this way they can pop a slice out of the freezer and in the oven for a few minutes- and bam- yummy (or so they tell me) pizza at home for a fraction of the cost.

Really- fraction of the cost.

Try for yourselves.

Enjoy- the cooliflower.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published by wiseassvegan

an organized full time working vegan -with plenty of ideas on getting everything done in the most simple and efficient way possible.

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