How (and why) I sprout my own sprouts

I love sprouts.

A great source of protein and vitamins, fresh , versatile, yummy . whats not to like?

I eat them fresh (raw as some might call it), cooked as mejadara, cooked as lentil stew, fresh in bean stew and more.

I only sprout ( for the time being) green and brown lentils, I read that red lentils were not made to sprout, and that beans and chickpeas are more difficult to sprout.

I also read that the smaller beans- mung, black-eyed peas and so on- were great for sprouting- but my online supermarket had a great sale on dried lentils so I bought tons of them- and will keep sprouting them till they are gone-and then go on to try all the rest of the options- depending which ones are on sale at the moment.

*Dried beans and lentils , dried fruit, nuts , oil (I buy unrefined coconut oil for my natural deodorant , olive oil for salads and canola oil for cooking) , raw tahini, agava syrup, tomato paste , pasta , grains, T.P , hand soap and dish soap, laundry soap and such-are all things that I buy in stocks when they are on sale. saves me a lot of money-since they don’t mind waiting patiently for their turn, and rarely get infected by ants and such.

*Every once in a while I deliberately dry out my stocks- so I can see clearly what I have and what I need to re-stock on. I discovered that when I get to the habit of stocking without thoroughly checking my pantry and all my shelves- I end up over crowding the pantry . re-arranging and re-counting every thing I have in my kitchen is something that helps me keep it clean and organized. ( ok in a fairly good condition).

Back to my sprouting.

Why bother sprouting at home?

1.Because it’s so easy to.

2. because it makes you feel like a true and genuine farmer even in a one room apartment in a crowded city.

3. because this way you can have fresh sprouts exactly when you want it .

4. because this way you don’t have to start guessing and estimating how old your store-bought sprouts are, and when will they rot. (the answer- exactly when you are ready to eat them).

I think I made a very persuasive argument- if I do say so myself.

So how easy exactly is this?

  1. soak a bag of dried lentils in water for 12 hours. (for the night or as you get up and prepare to go to work-I use both methods).

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make an effort to change the water at least once during that period- I don’t leave work and go home to change the sprouts water but assuming you don’t indulge yourself in 12 hour sleeping periods (ahhhhhhhhh just the mere thought of that) than you can change the water once you get up. in the heavy summer days I soak’m in the fridge.

2. strain the soaked lentils and leave them in the strainer for another 24 hours, wetting the lentils every 4-5 hours approximately (I don’t get up in the middle of the night to water the sprouts but as soon as I wake up I water them). put the strainer in a big enough bowl, so the excess water won’t spill all over your counter, cover the bowl with a towel and put in a fairly dark place.

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3. when the sprouts are out there- approximately after 24 hours or so-store in the fridge for no longer than 4-5 days max, I read it can be easily frozen- haven’t tried it- I always finish the whole batch…..

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this is how they look (in a bean stew). pretty!

go soak some lentils.

enjoy- the cooliflower.

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